Raising Concerns

Page 2 of 2

Raising Concerns

Raising Concerns City or municipal networks have pressing security issuesWireless transmission is usually a topic that raises many concerns in the security world. It seems common knowledge nowadays that a wireless network can be easily hacked, and private information can end up on the Internet or someone’s identity can be stolen. This is a major concern at the consumer level. When you walk into a computer store looking for the latest wireless 802.11 access point, security and encryption features are written all over the box, and you will most likely end up buying whatever seems to have the highest level of encryption. Most of today’s home access points have advanced encryption systems mainly to prevent a neighbor from stealing a Wi-Fi connection.

Security and encryption becomes even more relevant in a corporate network where even the smallest breach could lead to a major security threat and millions of dollars in damages. Different from home networks, corporate networks get attacked on a regular basis, so a high level of security is needed. The issue is even more relevant for city or municipal networks since they could be controlling some key operations that could heavily affect a city and its safety.

The issue of network safety and security is real and an important one to keep in mind; however, the key question that needs to be asked is how network security and encryption on wireless differs from a wired network. The truth is: It’s not very different. Wireless networks are not necessarily less secure than wired networks. What people don’t realize is that sometimes it is easier to tap into a switch in a cabinet than to play around with wireless. So, let’s review some of the key things that should be kept in mind to make a wireless network secure.

Transmission protocols. Wireless networks can be divided in two groups: ones that use a standardized transmission protocol and ones that use a proprietary transmission protocol. A standardized transmission protocol, for example, is 802.11, 802.15 or Zigbee. It is a protocol that follows certain characteristics to guarantee interoperability between devices made by different manufacturers. Standard Wi-Fi connectivity is probably the best example of this. When you go to Starbucks and connect to the wireless network, it doesn’t matter if you are using an Apple or a PC, an iPhone or Android, or even a Blackberry because they all have a Wi-Fi-compatible interface that allows you to connect to the network.

This is great for public Wi-Fi and any network that requires compatibility with multiple devices; however, this also poses a threat when it comes to security, as there are numerous devices that can communicate with your network.

Consequently, if security is your main concern, you should try to look for a wireless network that uses a proprietary transmission protocol because this will strongly limit the number of people who will be able to access it.

Authenticated routing. Regardless of the type of transmission protocol you are using, authenticated routing will prevent other wireless devices from interacting with your network. This is a key feature on the majority of wireless devices, but, before committing to any specific solution, you should know if it offers authenticated routing and understand how it does it.

Authenticated routing is enforced with a passphrase that is needed for two access points to communicate. WPA and WPA-2 are two of the most common authentication standards on a Wi-Fi network and provide a reasonable level of protection. It also is worth noting that WEP is no longer a secure method to prevent hackers from getting into your network and should be avoided at all costs. WEP can be cracked in less than five minutes using any laptop and software that is readily available on the web.

Control user impact. Most security breaches are, in fact, due to lack of knowledge on the user’s part. One of the most common accidents is caused by the so-called Rogue Access Point, a standard open 802.11 AP that is wired into the network by one of its users. This needs to be prevented as it could jeopardize the overall safety of the network and create a very easy entry point for hackers.

Detecting Rogue Access Points is a feature that is usually present on most enterprise networks. In home or small office networks where consumer-grade access points are used, though, this feature is not present, so attention should be given to other people attaching access points to the network.

Filter the MAC addresses. This allows control over which devices have access to the network, thus preventing another unknown device from being able to connect. This also prevents unknown devices, such as laptops or cellphones, from connecting to the wireless access point and is an effective way to keep tabs on who uses the network.

Encryption. Usually accomplished using a built-in encryption module on the wireless device or by adding a VPN box to the network, the goal of encrypting traffic is to add an additional level of protection to the data traveling on the network to prevent people from being able to understand the information being transmitted.

Most devices on the market use AES-128 bit or AES-256 bit encryption. The AES standard is one of the most widely adopted encryption systems due to its high level of security.

When activating encryption, it is important to keep in mind network performance. Given the large amount of data processing needed for encryption, it’s usually recommended to use a device with a dedicated encryption module or a separate device to avoid creating an overhead on the network.

Limit the range of the network. Limiting the power output and controlling the coverage area by using directional antennas are very effective ways to reduce the number of people that could have access to the network and might try to hack into it. More power is not always equivalent to a better connection due to issues such as co-location interference that might be present in a network with more than one access point that are close to each other. Controlling the output power of the access point can be easily done through the user interface with just a few clicks.

Wireless networks can be very secure and reliable transmission systems as long as certain rules are kept in mind and adhered to. In addition to upgrading to the latest technology and encryption systems, employees’ knowledge goes a long way in making any network more secure, regardless of whether it is wired or wireless.

This article originally appeared in the April 2014 issue of Security Today.

About the Author

Cosimo Malesci has been a forerunner in using wireless networks for security and industrial applications, providing new and cutting edge services. He holds both a bachelor and master degree in Ocean Engineering from MIT. After working in the marine engineering field, he co-founded Fluidmesh in late 2004 with offices in Boston, MA and Milan, Italy. This new venture has allowed him to apply his fine understanding of engineering to the wireless world.

Fluidmesh has been a pioneer in the development of wireless technology by focusing on top-quality products for large areas at risk such as municipalities, industrial plants, seaports and marinas, archaeological sites, resorts, theme parks and racing tracks. In less than five years time, Fluidmesh has positioned itself as a leading manufacturer in the market by focusing on thorough and practical solutions in a world increasingly preoccupied by connectivity and security matters.


Featured

  • Maximizing Your Security Budget This Year

    7 Ways You Can Secure a High-Traffic Commercial Security Gate  

    Your commercial security gate is one of your most powerful tools to keep thieves off your property. Without a security gate, your commercial perimeter security plan is all for nothing. Read Now

  • Survey: Only 13 Percent of Research Institutions Are Prepared for AI

    A new survey commissioned by SHI International and Dell Technologies underscores the transformative potential of artificial intelligence (AI) while exposing significant gaps in preparedness at many research institutions. Read Now

  • Survey: 70 Percent of Organizations Have Established Dedicated SaaS Security Teams

    Seventy percent of organizations have prioritized investment in SaaS security, establishing dedicated SaaS security teams, despite economic uncertainty and workforce reductions. This was a key finding in the fourth Annual SaaS Security Survey Report: 2025 CISO Plans and Priorities released today by the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA), the world’s leading organization dedicated to defining standards, certifications, and best practices to help ensure a secure cloud computing environment. Read Now

  • Mobile Applications Are Empowering Security Personnel

    From real-time surveillance and access control management to remote monitoring and communications, a new generation of mobile applications is empowering security personnel to protect people and places. Mobile applications for physical security systems are emerging as indispensable tools to enhance safety. They also offer many features that are reshaping how modern security professionals approach their work. Read Now

Featured Cybersecurity

Webinars

New Products

  • Camden CM-221 Series Switches

    Camden CM-221 Series Switches

    Camden Door Controls is pleased to announce that, in response to soaring customer demand, it has expanded its range of ValueWave™ no-touch switches to include a narrow (slimline) version with manual override. This override button is designed to provide additional assurance that the request to exit switch will open a door, even if the no-touch sensor fails to operate. This new slimline switch also features a heavy gauge stainless steel faceplate, a red/green illuminated light ring, and is IP65 rated, making it ideal for indoor or outdoor use as part of an automatic door or access control system. ValueWave™ no-touch switches are designed for easy installation and trouble-free service in high traffic applications. In addition to this narrow version, the CM-221 & CM-222 Series switches are available in a range of other models with single and double gang heavy-gauge stainless steel faceplates and include illuminated light rings. 3

  • Luma x20

    Luma x20

    Snap One has announced its popular Luma x20 family of surveillance products now offers even greater security and privacy for home and business owners across the globe by giving them full control over integrators’ system access to view live and recorded video. According to Snap One Product Manager Derek Webb, the new “customer handoff” feature provides enhanced user control after initial installation, allowing the owners to have total privacy while also making it easy to reinstate integrator access when maintenance or assistance is required. This new feature is now available to all Luma x20 users globally. “The Luma x20 family of surveillance solutions provides excellent image and audio capture, and with the new customer handoff feature, it now offers absolute privacy for camera feeds and recordings,” Webb said. “With notifications and integrator access controlled through the powerful OvrC remote system management platform, it’s easy for integrators to give their clients full control of their footage and then to get temporary access from the client for any troubleshooting needs.” 3

  • Camden CV-7600 High Security Card Readers

    Camden CV-7600 High Security Card Readers

    Camden Door Controls has relaunched its CV-7600 card readers in response to growing market demand for a more secure alternative to standard proximity credentials that can be easily cloned. CV-7600 readers support MIFARE DESFire EV1 & EV2 encryption technology credentials, making them virtually clone-proof and highly secure. 3