Las Vegas Casinos Continue to Increase Security After Mass Shooting

Las Vegas Casinos Continue to Increase Security After Mass Shooting

Hotels and casinos on the Las Vegas Strip are increasing security with K-9 units and advanced technology.

Las Vegas tourists are demanding more visible signs of security at the Las Vegas Strip hotels and casinos, according to Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo. 

"No one knows what a terrorist looks like," Lombardo said at a lunch event for the Las Vegas Hospitality Association. "Stephen Paddock didn't look like a terrorist."

One year after the mass shooting, security management is still at the forefront of casino officials' minds. Executive Vice President and General Counsel at Caesars Entertainment, Timothy Donovan told the Las Vegas Review Journal that security is top of mind in light of the terrible events of last yer.

"It made everyone step back and look at their security protocol, their security personnel and their security standards," Donovan said.

Donovan said that security at casinos and hotels are something that you have to look at continuously, "you don't want to become complacent," he said.

Some of the security measures that have been implemented since the mass shooting are increased security visibility including more K-9 units and police. Donovan said the increased K-9 units have been an "effective tool" for casinos across the Strip. 

"Our guests seem to like it," Donovan said. "It makes them feel secure, and they do a great job."

Metropolitan Police Department Capt. John Pelletier advised hotels and casinos to consider security budgets more than a cost. He encouraged hotels to prepare go bags of flashlights, access keys, and current maps; train employees to lead law enforcement through tunnels of buildings, and invest in cameras at the cages that are just as good as the ones looking at the players's cards.

Pelletier said local hotels and casinos are experimenting with new facial recognition and weapons detection technology on their properties. 

"I can't tell you what the business model should be, but I can tell you what the best practice should be," Pelletier said. "You're got to balance your freedom and liberties with this increased security."

About the Author

Sydny Shepard is the Executive Editor of Campus Security & Life Safety.

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